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Truth? Lies? Riveting.

06.06.13 0
Zoom cavetocanvas:

Gregory Crewdson, Untitled, 1998
From the Indianapolis Museum of Art:

A solitary man stands in a dark driveway holding a six-pack of beer, spellbound by a shaft of light. Gregory Crewdson has carefully composed each detail in this photograph, part of his series “Twilight,” in which various residents of an anonymous town are transfixed by seemingly paranormal forces at dusk.
Citing the films of Stephen Spielberg and David Lynch as influences, Crewdson acts as director to actors and a full production crew. His elaborate process results in a single picture, which he refers to as a “single-frame movie.” Here, small-town America is depicted as both familiar and strange, threatening and miraculous.

cavetocanvas:

Gregory Crewdson, Untitled, 1998

From the Indianapolis Museum of Art:

A solitary man stands in a dark driveway holding a six-pack of beer, spellbound by a shaft of light. Gregory Crewdson has carefully composed each detail in this photograph, part of his series “Twilight,” in which various residents of an anonymous town are transfixed by seemingly paranormal forces at dusk.

Citing the films of Stephen Spielberg and David Lynch as influences, Crewdson acts as director to actors and a full production crew. His elaborate process results in a single picture, which he refers to as a “single-frame movie.” Here, small-town America is depicted as both familiar and strange, threatening and miraculous.

04.12.13 5741
Zoom explore-blog:

We lost Kurt Vonnegut on April 11, 2007 – but his timeless shapes of stories endure and never cease to delight.

explore-blog:

We lost Kurt Vonnegut on April 11, 2007 – but his timeless shapes of stories endure and never cease to delight.

04.12.13 205
Media Influence - An Introduction

An introduction to key terms and concepts for, Outcome 3, Unit 4 in the VCE by Alex Maunder

04.11.13 0

cinephilearchive:

A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies (1995). A 14 part film studies course that you can take from anywhere in the world and learned from again and again. (With thanks to TheDozingLion)

Despite its nearly four-hour running time, this is a uniquely personal look at movies from one of the late 20th century’s great directors and film historians. The film consists of head & shoulder shots of Scorsese speaking into the camera for a minute or two, followed by 10-15 minutes of film clips with Scorsese voice-over. Scorsese approaches the films in terms of how they affected him as a director foremost and as a storyteller/film fan second. Segments include “The Director as Smuggler,” “The Director as Iconoclast”, and so on. The Journey begins with silent masters like D.W. Griffith and ends in 1969 - when Scorsese began to make films; as he says in closing, “I wouldn’t feel right commenting on myself or my contemporaries.”

We love Martin Scorsese to death — and we could listen to the man talk about cinema for hours on end. Scorsese’s passion for the artform is palpable when he speaks, yet unlike so many beginning Film Studies professors, Scorsese makes even the historical evolution of the medium fascinating. As proof, we offer you this presentation from the Raging Bull filmmaker from the 2013 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities, presented by Scorsese himself back on April 1 at the Kennedy for the Performing Arts. Scorsese’s discussion, entitled “Persistence of Vision: Reading the Language of Cinema”, is an hour-long breakdown of the history and magic of movies as only the filmmaker can present it. The speech contains not only historical facts about the evolution of cinema as an artform (including the observation that it really doesn’t matter who started cinema — because “all beginnings are unfathomable”), but also some very personal observations from Scorsese’s own life revealing how his love for the movies blossomed from early childhood.

The multimedia presentation is as interesting as one would expect, with Scorsese working in still images and scenes from films to help make his points. The opening features a sequence from 1950’s The Magic Box that seems perfectly fitted to the topic at hand. It’s not all history, though – Scorsese gets technical too, showing how image restoration works to make less than pristine prints of movies look new again while explaining things like auteur theory. It’s like a master class in cinema – and it’ll only take up an hour of your time! Check out the video here. If you’re a fan of Scorsese or just interested in the evolution of one of the world’s greatest artforms, this is essential viewing. Oh, and if you want to skip the preamble, Scorsese’s actual presentation starts at around the 23-minute mark. —Mike Bracken

2013 Jefferson Lecture Live Stream

The essential documentaries on Martin Scorsese, including The Scorsese Machine (1990), A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies (1995), American Masters: Martin Scorsese Directs (1990), A Decade Under the Influence (2003), Italianamerican (1974), American Boy: A Profile of: Steven Prince (Martin Scorsese, 1978), Glass: A Portrait of Philip in Twelve Parts (2007), and The Real Goodfella (2006).

04.06.13 51
Zoom alicechanart:

Medusa by *Alicechan
03.20.13 471

Jimi Hendrix “Somewhere” from the new album “People, Hell and Angels”
There’s been so many shitty Jimi releases over the years. This one is different. Every track feels finished - not some half baked studio idea from yesteryear. The mixing is thick and rich. This is a PROPER Jimi album that deserves to stand beside his official catalogue.

Love.

03.19.13 1
For of all creatures that breathe and creep about on the earth, there is none so miserable as man.

Zeus, commenting on the fate of mortals.

Homer. The Iliad.  XVII. 446 - 447. (trans. E.V. Rieu)

03.18.13 260
James Doakes says 'Surprise Motherfucker' for ten minutes. - YouTube
03.15.13 0
Fuck Yeah, Ancient Greece and Rome: The Classical Calendar: March 15

fuckyeahancientclassics:

44 BCE

Gaius Julius Caesar is assassinated

So the Classical Calendar, like the Prodigal Son, returns with tail between legs, begging its followers for forgiveness.

And what a date to come back on!

Et tu, Brute? Then fall, Caesar.

So we all know how important Caesar was, and we all…

03.15.13 53
Pixar's 22 rules of storytelling

From the masters.

03.08.13 1
TheNarratorOfBastion

Genius Reddit commentor. 

03.07.13 0

"Ascenseur pour l’échafaud" full movie complete with English subtitles. Soundtrack by the one and only Miles Davis. 

 

03.06.13 0
Zoom I never wanted a horse growing up, I wanted a Shorse.

I never wanted a horse growing up, I wanted a Shorse.

03.05.13 5
Zoom make-hate:

Django
03.05.13 35